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Girl Scout Thin Mints and Panama Geisha 

Girl Scout Thin Mints and Panama Geisha 

NEW TOY!

NEW TOY!

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My roaster and I were very fortunate to visit origin last year. In El Salvador and Brazil respectively, we saw first hand where our coffee originates and what it goes through before we receive the beans in our warehouse.

Here’s a wee video documenting coffee’s journey from the nursery to your cup. Of course, it’s not the be-all and end-all of coffee processing education, but it’s a great place to start if you’ve ever been curious on where coffee comes from or how it’s processed. 

This video begins at the farm, takes you through the processing station, and gives a snapshot of what happens once we get the coffee at our roastery. 

Complete with beautiful still shots and a few video clips, we’ve complied the timeline of events that must take place before coffee can be enjoyed. 

Thanks to Alexa Hunt, our former Production Assistant, for editing this video and bringing it all together!

coffee-coffee:

Click here for more coffee!

a purrrrrfect latte! 

coffee-coffee:

Click here for more coffee!

a purrrrrfect latte! 

(via coffeenotes)

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This week only we are offering FREE standard flat rate shipping on our Panama Los Lajones Bambu Geisha

Order any bags of the Geisha and get free shipping on your entire order. 

ENTER COUPON CODE: shipmygeisha

This also applies to our Grand Reserve Sampler which includes the Geisha and two other top rated coffees from Hawaii and Ethiopia.

Order today to ensure delivery by Thanskgiving!

These donuts are scaaaary good! #bigcentral #bigdonuts Thanks @cafeimports

These donuts are scaaaary good! #bigcentral #bigdonuts Thanks @cafeimports

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@nickcho: Dave Chappelle, Bicyclists, and Baristas: On Unrealistic Expectations

nickcho:

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Trish and I had tickets to the Dave Chappelle “Oddball Comedy Festival” a couple weeks ago. Damn it, I got us some pretty good seats! Unfortunately, there was a scheduling conflict that drew us to Seattle on that weekend, so the spoils of my speedy mouse-clicks and page refresh…

LOVE this blog by Mr. Nick Cho. 

americastestkitchen:

We know you’ve seen it, maybe you’ve tried it—but how many meltdowns (and overflows) have you had? Introducing: The quick, no-fail, and incredibly foolproof Coffee Mug Molten Chocolate Cake for Two. Get the recipe, and see for yourself.

Another use for your favorite coffee mug! 

americastestkitchen:

We know you’ve seen it, maybe you’ve tried it—but how many meltdowns (and overflows) have you had? 

Introducing: The quick, no-fail, and incredibly foolproof Coffee Mug Molten Chocolate Cake for Two. 

Get the recipe, and see for yourself.

Another use for your favorite coffee mug! 

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A term often thrown around the roasting end of the specialty coffee industry is “roasting philosophy”.   In particular, it is most often heard as, “What is your roasting philosophy?” 

But what exactly does that mean?

Is it how you choose to physically approach roasting coffee, or does it refer to something more metaphysical?

If asked about my approach roasting coffee, my response is typically something along the lines of, “Don’t mess it up.”  This may sound a bit snarky, and to the people who know me well that would come as no surprise.  However, it really is just a short way of saying something that I am pretty passionate about. 

The development of my roasting philosophy began during a trip to origin.  The manager of a farm held a seed, which was soon to become a coffee tree.  He told the group that at that point the seed in his hand possessed every bit of potential it would ever have to make the best coffee it could.  From that point on quality would only leave.  It is his job to nurture the coffee as a tree, he keeps as much quality in that coffee as he possibly can.  Then when it goes to the mill, it is their responsibility to preserve the state of quality that the coffee possesses when it comes to their hands… and so on.

With that in mind, “Don’t mess it up,” took on a whole new meaning.  It encouraged me to not only acknowledge, but also respect the hard work of all of the hands that the coffee has touched.  

“Don’t mess it up,” is now just my funny way of saying, “Roast with respect.”

Bigs always lays on my purse. Shortly after this picture he started attacking the fringe.

Bigs always lays on my purse. Shortly after this picture he started attacking the fringe.